⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible

Thursday, September 23, 2021 3:07:07 AM

The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible



She notes that for people to understand and form bonds with one another, it is extremely important to reveal their identity as masking it Why Do We Hide Our Identity arises suspicions. Creative Essay Topic Brainstorm 7. Throughout the novel, Piper emphasises the idea that all actions have consequences, however, this idea is not limited Enlightenment After The American Revolution Ibaraki. The Whistler Journal. One day, he repairs the radio of a Nazi official, who recruits him to The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible Hitler Youth on The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible of his ingenuity and his very blonde The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible and very blue eyes, The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible to be The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible traits by the regime. This supports the idea that all actions have difference between unconscious and subconscious, no matter their The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible. The final act The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible that fall in the Salem jail.

Character of John Proctor -The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Following on from the video, the content below is an expansion upon Stories We Tell. Throughout Stories We Tell , Polley continually emphasises the impossibility of knowing a truth with absolute certainty. Continuing the theme of ambiguity within her synthetic documentary, Sarah Polley demonstrates that individuals can develop their own interpretations of the truth, in spite of her stance on the validity of singular truths. Building on her depiction of the truth as fallible, Polley thus emphasises our need to tell stories, illustrating how they allow one to better understand themselves, their families and the world around them.

Throughout the documentary, Polley demonstrates, both explicitly and implicitly, a number of her inherent values. Drawing upon these, referring to them in your essays and most importantly! I found this to be a coherent and structured way of including this deeper level of thinking in the publication of my own essays! Such a line of thinking directly correlates to the postmodernism literary theory - notable for being hostile to absolutes such as truth, and not creating a text in isolation.

Polley continually blurs the line between fact and fiction within Stories We Tell - an ode to the postmodernist school of thought she is following. Another feature of postmodernism in literature is the relationship between one text to another. In her creation of Stories We Tell , Sarah Polley exacerbates this relationship, including a number of extradiegetic elements such as newspaper clippings, emails, songs and segments from other productions in order to add greater meaning to the documentary.

A philosophical and, at-times political commentary on the way stories are told and the nature of truth. Upon first glance this point may seem rather convoluted, and several viewings of the text are necessary to fully engage with this line of thinking. Essentially, this centres around the idea that the different forms, mediums and extradiegetic elements present in the documentary can significantly influence how we as an audience react to the story that is being told.

The best way to explain this is to acknowledge the level of credibility and the associations attached to each individual medium used to tell the story. For example, what impact does the newspaper clipping detailing her custody battle and fight for equality in a restrictive society have on our sympathy for Diane? Does the sense of credibility and validity drawn from an upstanding publication such as a newspaper elicit a greater sense of trust and acceptance of fact from viewers - therefore making us as an audience more inclined to view her in a positive light?

Feel free to apply this line of thinking to other aspects of the text - such a deeper engagement with the philosophical ideas of the text are far more likely to score highly, as opposed to shallow pieces that merely discuss the storytellers in isolation - and not what they represent. The notion of truth seems to be just as much of a theme through this blog as it is in the documentary! Polley implies this by giving him a greater voice in the documentary through his role as the narrator. What Is Text Response? Text Response Criteria 3. How To Write a Text Response. Like its name, Text Response is when you respond to a text. The most popular texts are novels and films; however, plays, poetry and short stories are also common.

Your response will be in the form of an essay, in which you discuss themes, ideas and characters. Recall all the novels and films you've studied since Year 7 there'll be quite a few! You should be very familiar with the process of watching a film or reading a novel, participating in class discussions about themes and characters, and finally, submitting an essay based on the text. As you graduate into higher year levels, you spend each year revising and improving on TEEL, learning to better incorporate quotes and formulating even longer essays than the year before remember when you thought you couldn't possibly write an essay more than words? Let's get into it! What are teachers and examiners expecting to see in your essays?

Note: Some schools may express the following points differently, however, they should all boil down to the same points - what is necessary in a Text Response essay. Why is it that we can automatically distinguish between a protagonist from an antagonist? Why is it that we know whether or not the author supports or denounces an idea? Here you need to start looking at how the author constructs their texts and why they have made that choice. For example, the author describes a protagonist using words with positive connotations kind, brave, charming , whereas the antagonist is described with words using negative connotations vain, egocentric, selfish.

For example, 'in Harry Potter , by describing the protagonist Harry as "brave", the author JK Rowling exhibits the idea of how possessing bravery when making tough choices or facing challenges is a strong and positive trait. Society, history and culture all shape and influence us in our beliefs and opinions. Understanding their values embodied in texts can help us as readers, identity and appreciate theme and character representations. For example, 'through the guilty verdict of Tom Robinson in To Kill A Mockingbird , Harper Lee expresses the belief that the American legal system in the s was not always fair or just.

Be open to the idea that many texts can be interpreted in many ways. Texts are rarely concrete and simple. Take The Bible , a book that is one of the most popular and famous books in history but is interpreted differently by every person. Acknowledging more than one perspective on a certain aspect of the text, or acknowledging that perhaps the writer is intentionally ambiguous, is a valuable skill that demonstrates you have developed a powerful insight into your text. For example, 'in The Thing Around Your Neck , feminist readers condone Adichie's stories which all revolve around women either as protagonist or as narrators, giving voice to the disempowered gender in Nigerian society. While you should absolutely know how to embed quotes in your essay like a boss , you want to have other types of evidence in your Text Response essay.

This encompasses a huge breadth of things from metaphors to structure to language. For example, 'The personification of Achilles as "wolf, a violator of every law of men and gods", illustrates his descent from human to animal…. To learn more about metalanguage, read our ' What Is Metalanguage? When examiners read essays, they are expected to get through about essays in an hour! This results in approximately 5 minutes to read, get their head around, and grade your essay - not much time at all!

The number of allocated marks are:. Exactly when Text Response is assessed within each unit is dependent on each school; some schools at the start of the Unit, others at the end. The time allocated to your SAC is also school-based. Often, schools use one or more periods combined, depending on how long each of your periods last. In your exam, you get a whopping total of 3 hours to write 3 essays Text Response, Comparative and Language Analysis. The general guide is 60 minutes on Text Response, however, it is up to you exactly how much time you decide to dedicate to this section of the exam. Your Text Response essay will be graded out of 10 by two different examiners. Your two unique marks from these examiners will be combined, with 20 as the highest possible mark.

This is just to get you thinking on the different study methods you can try before a SAC. Rereading a book enables you to refresh your memory on subplots, popular passages and most importantly, helps you fill in any missing gaps in knowledge. Take this as an opportunity to get familiar with the parts of the texts you're less confident with, or to examine a particular theme that you know you're weaker in HINT: A good place to start is to make sure you know the difference between themes, motifs and symbols! This is like an advanced version of rereading a book. As you move through the passage, you can pick out interesting word choices made by the author and try to interpret why they have made this choice.

Doing a close analysis will immensely strengthen your metalanguage analysis skills, and also give you the opportunity to stand out from other students because you can offer unique and original analysis and evidence in your essay. I know this can be a bit confusing, so this video below shows a full close analysis of a Macbeth passage in action:. Doing this study all by yourself can be rather daunting, so we've got your back. We specialise in supporting VCE English by creating helpful videos, study guides and ebooks. Here are some just to get your started:. Check out our entire YouTube channel and don't forget to subscribe for regular new videos!

Our awesome team of English high-achievers have written up study guides based on popular VCE texts. Here's a compilation of all the ones we've covered so far:. Tip: You can download and save many of these study guides for your own study use! How good is that? Most people seem to the think the most difficult part of Text Response is the writing component - and they're not completely wrong. However, what I've found is that not even students place emphasis on the brainstorming, preparation and planning of Text Response. Even if you write an exceptional essay, if it doesn't answer the prompt, your teacher won't be sticking a smiley face on your work.

We need to avoid these common teacher criticisms, and I have no doubt you've experienced at least once the dreaded, 'you're not answering the prompt', 'you could've used a better example' or 'more in-depth analysis needed'. This is a strategy I developed over the past 10 years of tutoring, and I've seen my students improve their marks every time. Often, teachers will provide you with a list of prompts to practice before your SAC. Some teachers can be kind enough to hint you in the direction of a particular prompt that may be on the SAC.

We have a number of free essay topics curated by our team at LSG, check some of them out. Also go scroll back up to our list of study guides above, as most of those also have essay prompts included:. Once you've done some preliminary revision, it's time to write plans! Plans will help ensure you stick to your essay topic and have a clear outline of what your essay will cover. This clarity is crucial to success in a Text Response essay. Doing plans is also an extremely time-efficient way to approach SACs. Rather than slaving away hours upon hours over writing essays, writing plans can will save you the burnout and will get you feeling confident faster.

I've curated essay topic breakdown videos based on specific VCE texts. Writers only get better by actually writing. Even if you just tackle a couple of essays then at least you will have started to develop a thinking process that will help you to set out arguments logically, utilise important quotes and time yourself against the clock. It will help you write faster as well — something that is a major problem for many students. With that said, let's get into how to write a Text Response next.

If you need any more tips on how to learn your text in-depth, Susan's English study score 50 Steps for Success in Text Study guide provides a clear pathway for how to approach your text and is a must read for VCE English students! Understanding the different types will help you move beyond a 'basic' one-size-fits-all structure. Try to keep your introduction to the point. There's no need to prolong an introduction just to make a set number of sentences. It's always better to be concise and succinct, and then move into your main body paragraphs where the juicy contents of your essay resides.

If your teacher or school teaches you something slightly different - that's okay too. At the end of the day the foundations are the same. Planning is an essential part of any successful text response essay. For a specific type of prompt, you have specific criteria to meet — for example, in a metalanguage-based prompt , you immediately know that any evidence you brainstorm in your planning stage should be based around the literary techniques used in your given text. In regard to this Macbeth prompt, for example, you could explore the different ways the theme of ambition is presented in the text. Additionally, the themes of guilt and power are intimately related to ambition in the text, so you can use those other ideas to aid your brainstorming and get you a step ahead of the rest of the state come exam day.

Once you know this, you can assume that each example you brainstorm has to be relevant to the specific character named in the prompt in some way. Remember, however, that the actions of characters are always connected to the themes and ideas the author is trying to convey. This can be achieved by discussing metalanguage — language that describes language read my blog post about it here. These prompts tell you immediately that you need to be thinking about the literary techniques explored in the text and explain how they affect the narrative. Rear Window. This type of prompt is very similar to How-based prompts, specifically in the fact that the discussion of literary techniques is essential.

For this type of prompt specifically, however, the actual techniques used can form more of a basis for your arguments, unlike in How-based prompts. There are two main things that you should do when presented with this type of prompt. Firstly, contextualise the quote in your essay and try to use it in your analysis in some way. Secondly, interpret the themes and issues addressed in the quote and implement these into your discussion. The best place to do both of these is in a body paragraph — it weaves in seamlessly and allows for a good amount of analysis, among other reasons! When faced with unknown prompts in a SAC or your exam, it's reassuring to have a formulaic breakdown of the prompt so that your brain immediately starts categorising the prompt - which of the 5 types of prompts does this one in front of me fall into?

Not gonna lie, this novel is a bit of a tricky one to introduce. World War II, arguably one of the darkest events of human history, has been the basis of so much writing across so many genres; authors, academics, novelists have all devoted themselves to understanding the tragedies, and make sense of how we managed to do this to one another. Many reflect on the experiences of children and families whose lives were torn apart by the war. In some ways, Doerr is another author who has attempted this. His novel alludes to the merciless anonymity of death in war, juxtaposes individualism with collective national mindlessness, and seeks out innocence amidst the brutality of war.

What makes this novel difficult to introduce is the way in which Doerr has done this; through the eyes of two children on opposite sides of the war, he explores how both of them struggle with identity, morality and hope, each in their own way. Their storylines converge in the bombing of Saint-Malo, demonstrating that war can be indiscriminate in its victims—that is, it does not care if its victims are children or adults, innocent or guilty, French or German. However, their interaction also speaks to the humanity that lies in all of us, no matter how deeply buried. Disclaimer: this is a very, very broad overview of the novel and it is absolutely not a substitute for actually reading it please actually read it.

Chronologically, we start in , five years before the war. As she starts to go blind, Daniel teaches her Braille, and makes her wooden models of their neighbourhood to help her navigate. Meanwhile, she befriends Etienne, who suffers from agoraphobia as a result of the trauma from the First World War. He is charming and very knowledgeable about science, having made a series of scientific radio broadcasts with his brother Henri who died in WWI. She also befriends his cook, Madame Manec, who participates in the resistance movement right up until she falls ill and dies.

Her father is also arrested and would ultimately die in prison , and the loss of their loved ones prompts both Etienne and Marie-Laure to begin fighting back. Marie-Laure is also given a key to a grotto by the seaside which is full of molluscs, her favourite kind of animal. On the other side of the war, Werner is, in , an 8 year-old German boy growing up in an orphanage with his sister Jutta in the small mining town of Zollverein. One day, he repairs the radio of a Nazi official, who recruits him to the Hitler Youth on account of his ingenuity and his very blonde hair and very blue eyes, considered to be desirable traits by the regime.

Jutta grows increasingly distant from Werner during this time, as she questions the morality of the Nazis. Werner is trained to be a soldier along with a cohort of other boys, and additionally learns to use radio to locate enemy soldiers. He befriends Frederick, an innocent kid who was only there because his parents were rich—Frederick would eventually fall victim to the brutality of the instructors, and Werner tries to quit out of solidarity. Unfortunately, he is sent into the army to apply his training to actual warfare. He fights with Frank Volkheimer, a slightly ambiguous character who a tough and cruel soldier, but also displays a capacity to be kind and gentle including a fondness for classical music.

The war eventually takes them to Saint-Malo. Also around or so, a Nazi sergeant, Reinhold von Rumpel, begins to track down the Sea of Flames. He would have been successful ultimately had it not been for Werner, who stops him in order to save Marie Laure. As America begins to turn the war around, Werner is arrested and dies after stepping on a German landmine; Marie-Laure and Etienne move back to Paris. Marie-Laure eventually becomes a scientist specialising in the study of molluscs and has an extensive family of her own by What kind of questions does Doerr raise through this plot?

To some degree, the single central question of the novel is one of humanity, and this manifests in a few different ways. Firstly, to what extent are we in control of our own choices? Do we truly have free will to behave morally? The Nazi regime throws a spanner in the works here, as it makes incredibly inhumane demands on its people. Perhaps they fear punishment and have no choice—Werner, for instance, does go along with everything. At the same time, his own sister manages to demonstrate critical thinking and moral reasoning well beyond her years, and it makes you wonder if there was potential for Werner to be better in this regard. That being said, Werner is far from the only character who struggles with this—consider the perfumer, Claude Levitte, who becomes a Nazi informer, or even ordinary French citizens who simply accept the German takeover.

Do they actually have free will to resist, or is it even moral for them to do so? This is what allowed people to do evil things without actually feeling or even being inherently evil—they were just taking orders, after all. Consider the role of free will in this context. Etienne and Madame Manec, for instance, even disagree on the morality of resistance, which can frequently involve murder.

At the same time, the climactic event of the novel is an allied bombing of Saint-Malo, a French town, just because it had become a German outpost. On a more optimistic note, a human quality that Doerr explores is our natural curiosity towards science. This is abundant in the childhoods of both protagonists, as Werner demonstrates dexterity with the radio at a very young age, and Marie-Laure a keen interest in marine biology.

In particular, her blindness pushes her into avenues of science which she can experience without literal sight, such as the tactile sensations of mollusc shells. The title may hint at this—for all the light she cannot see, she seeks enlightenment through knowledge, which in turn gives her hope, optimism and purpose. This alludes to the banality of evil again; by focusing on his very technical role and his unique understanding of the science behind radios, he is able to blind himself to the bigger picture of the evils he is abetting.

Science is something that is so innately human, yet can also be used inhumanely as well. One major symbol is the radio , with its potential for good as well as for evil. On one hand, it is undoubtedly used for evil purposes, but it also acts as a source of hope, purpose, conviction and connection in the worst of times. It is what ultimately drives Werner to save Marie-Laure. Along the same vein, whelks are also a major symbol, particularly for Marie-Laure.

While an object of her fascination, they also represent strength for her, as they remain fixed onto rocks and withstand the beaks of birds who try to attack them. As Saint-Malo is destroyed and the Sea of Flames discarded, it is the seaside ecosystem that manages to live on, undisturbed. In this sense, the diamond can be seen as a manifestation of human greed, harmless once removed from human society. They represent his immense love for her, and more broadly the importance of family, but the models also attempt to shrink entire cities into a predictable, easily navigable system. The models are an oversimplification of life, and an illusion of certainty, in a time when life was complicated and not at all certain for anyone.

Identity, morality and hope—these things pretty much shape what it means to be human. Throughout All the Light We Cannot See though, characters sometimes struggle with all three of them at the same time. And yet they always manage to find something within themselves, some source of strength, some sense of right and wrong, some humanity in trying times. In this novel, Anthony Doerr tells the World War 2 story through a unique lens, or rather a unique combination of lenses, as he sets a year-old French girl and a year-old German boy on an unlikely path of convergence. Darkness in this sense could be any number of things.

Now, how should we plan for this topic? For our first paragraph, a good starting point might be analysing the literal forms of darkness in the novel, and seeing what other interpretations we can get from those. The title could be seen as an allusion to her character and by extension, the hopelessness that blindness might cause in the midst of a war. But, across these two layers of meaning, could there perhaps be some room to challenge these interpretations? This is something we should look at for our final paragraph.

These manifestations of light also require you to think about the different symbolic layers of the novel. Consider how, just as darkness has levels of interpretation and symbolism in this book, so does light and hope and joy, rather than just evil and cruelty. Always delving deeper for meaning helps you to really make use of the symbols, imagery and motifs in a text, and I hope this novel in particular illustrates that idea. Writing a film analysis can be daunting in comparison to analysing a written text. As the blinds roll up to reveal the apartment complex, a medium shot of the wide-open windows of each apartment immediately convey to the audience an environment of an uncomfortable openness.

However, despite this, the separation of each apartment by brick walls as a separate entity on its own serves as a symbol of the widespread suspicion characteristic of the McCarthyian era. Within the frame of the main window, the windows of each apartment act as mini frames within the big frame, multiplying the sense of voyeurism present in the shot. Although seemingly insignificant, the brown tabby cat that runs across the steps of Greenwich Village represents freedom and individual autonomy, later comparable to the character of Lisa in the film.

The compounding sense of surveillance during the s add more meaning to the freedom symbolised by the cat, which can then be contrasted to the suppressed independence of the protagonist, who is seen invalid in a wheelchair in the next shot:. By this extreme close-up shot of Jeff sleeping in his wheelchair during the opening sequence, Hitchcock immediately places the viewer in an uncomfortable position as the original and ultimate voyeur, surpassing the intimate boundaries of the protagonist. The stifling temperature of the season foreshadows imminent tension about to unfold in the film, as does the following close-up shot:.

This close shot of a destroyed, seemingly irreparable camera, literally reflects the cyclic nature of broken dreams characteristic of Greenwich Village, and also signifies that Jeff too has been hurt literally by radical pursuits in his progression. Despite varying in size and setting, they all share a single point of similarity; they all focus on sights of destruction, such as the race car crash or the remains of a volcanic eruption.

The last photograph the camera focuses on in the opening sequence is the picture taken by Jeff of an elegant woman, who bears a striking resemblance to Lisa. Want to save this for later? Download a PDF version of this blog here. This is a novel about the experiences of children recovering from polio inside a convalescent home in Perth. With a sympathetic and warm approach, London tells the tragic yet brave stories of these children, as well as the stories of their parents and carers.

The novel essentially revolves around Frank Gold, a Hungarian Jew and a war refugee, and London blends his mature voice with the innocence of a coming-of-age narrative, all set against the backdrop of World War II. These will be important considerations for text study, particularly if you are to write a creative response on this text for your SAC. If you are writing analytically on this text, either for your SAC or for your exam, you may still complete the exercises—each one should still be insightful for your writing in some way. Also, feel free to check the video below; it breaks down an analytical prompt for this text. This novel is set in Perth during the early s, which gives rise to a couple of interesting historical elements all intersecting in the book.

Crucially, the events of the novel take place for the most part while World War II is raging in Europe. This is important for understanding the backstory of the Gold family: they are Hungarian Jews who have escaped their war-torn home of Budapest to seek safety in Australia. In particular, we know that at some stage, Meyer had been taken away to a labour camp, and that Frank had had to hide himself in an attic.

In many ways, the story of the Golds is underpinned by tragedy—not only are they war refugees, but young Frank then contracts poliomyelitis known to us just as polio , which forces the family to reassess all the plans they had for him to settle into an ordinary, Australian life. However, Frank was far from the only victim of polio at the time—the entire nation was rocked by a wave of polio , with major outbreaks during the ss. This was quite a nerve-wracking, and causing great fear for our country and its active, outdoors-y culture.

The prospects of death, paralysis and permanent disability were understandably terrifying. About 70, people were affected, and almost half of them eventually died as a result. Almost every Australian at the time knew or knew of someone who had polio. I like to think that a lot of the themes in this book exist in diametric or opposing pairs. For instance, London gives Frank a voice that is wise beyond his years, yet uses it to tell a tender story of first love.

She also plays on the paradox that while some characters have become isolated due to the unfortunate events that have befallen them, these very events end up becoming the thing that unite them. Central to the novel are ideas of innocence or childhood. These ideas are really explored in the friendship between Frank and Elsa, who are both on the cusp of adolescence. While they are set up as young lovers in the eyes of readers, we know that they are far too young to truly have romantic feelings for each other. In actual fact, their interactions are permeated by a sense of innocence. However, these interactions are also punctuated by a sense of maturity , a desire for more.

This is evident to the extent where nurses are getting hesitant about leaving them alone with each other even though their parents still trust them entirely. In actual fact, these parents serve as an important point of contrast. Some manage to recapture the magic of youth even as adults—consider Ida reigniting her love for the piano, or Meyer jumping on opportunities to start anew. In this sense, innocence and maturity are a pair of themes that are interestingly not always found where one might expect. Another key thematic element of the novel is tragedy or adversity , which are relevant to a far wider gamut of characters.

However, on the other end of this spectrum is the strength required to cope with their suffering. While Sullivan had his indefatigable sense of humour, other characters have developed different mechanisms to stay strong in the face of adversity. Finally, London also tackles the idea of isolation , which can be seen as a consequence of tragedy—characters become isolated because they lose their ability to relate to others, and others feel unable to relate to them.

Symbolically, the Golden Age hospital is surrounded by four roads and therefore cut off from the world, almost as if quarantined. Your text response SAC is in two weeks. You decide to write a practice essay for your English teacher. Practice makes perfect, right? You stay up for hours, pouring your heart and soul into this essay. The result? Where did I go wrong? The examiners are looking for complex arguments , providing a variety of perspectives of the themes at hand.

This means that you should be discussing the prompt, not blindly agreeing with it. Do create complex arguments, or paragraphs with a twist! If you can justify your argument and it makes sense, include it in your essay. There are many ways that you could answer this question, but my plan looks like this:. Personally, I always struggled with starting an introduction. Having a strong start is essential to pave the way for a clear and concise essay. This is my start:. Topic sentence, evidence, explanation, link. The truth is that these elements are all very important in a body paragraph. Alexandre, Arsene. Duret, Theodore. Whistler Memorial Exhibtion. Boston, , no. Whistler Memorial Exhibition. Paris, , no. Benedite, Leonce.

Pennell, Elizabeth Robins and Joseph Pennell. London, , p. Cary, Elizabeth Luther. New York, , pp. The Whistler Journal. American Magazine of Art 12, 1 January : p. Pousette-Dart, Nathaniel J. James McNeill Whistler. New York, Laver, James. May 20, February 10, , p. Richardson, E. Whistler Loan Exhibition. Exhibition of James McNeill Whistler. New London, CT. Seattle, Landmarks in American Art, Sargent, Whistler and Mary Cassatt.

Chicago, , no. Hoopes, Donelson F. International Masterpieces. Columbus, Apollo 72, September : p. Gilman, R. Sutton, Denys. Novak, Barbara. American Painting of the Nineteenth Century. New York, , p. Holden, Donald. Whistler Landscapes and Seascapes. Prideaux, Tom. The World of Whistler Mendelowitz, D. A History of American Art, 2nd ed. DIA Handbook. Once in their camp, Priam falls to his knees and pleads Achilles for the body of his son. Appreciating the differences between The Iliad and Ransom storyline will lead to a better understanding of the themes and symbols in Ransom. In The Iliad , this journey is explored only momentarily and focuses more on the presence of Hermes.

The inclusion of the new character Somax in Ransom also offers a new perspective on this old tale. Take a look at our study guide below! How to Write a Killer Comparative Ebook. Ransom Study Guide. Ah, language analysis. No longer are we searching for hidden meanings within the text, instead we search for blatant appeals to emotions and values which our daring author uses to persuade us to stand in solidarity with their view.

My, how times change. Typical VCAA. We all know how tough it can be without the right kind of instruction, so worry not, everything you need will be explained for you shortly. Now, before you get too deep into this step - and I know how eager you must be to dive into that juicy analysis — you first need to decide on a structure. In this particular case of Language Analysis, we are comparing two articles, meaning we have a couple of different structures to choose from. That is, we now need to decide whether we will be separating the analysis of each article into its own individual paragraph, or rather, integrating the analysis and drawing on similar ideas from each of the texts to compare them within one paragraph.

Tough decisions, eh? While most examiners prefer integrated paragraphs, as it shows a higher level of understanding of the texts, sometimes the articles make implementing this structure a little difficult. For example, maybe one article focuses more on emotional appeals, while the other uses factual evidence such as statistics to persuade the reader. What do we do then? If none of the arguments are similar, but we still want to use that amazing integration technique, what can we do?

Well first of all, remember that we are comparing two articles. So what does this mean for us? We can still integrate our paragraphs, however, we will be focusing on how two contrasting techniques seek to achieve the same result of persuading the audience. That is, scouring through the articles for those various language devices the author has used to turn this article from an exposition to a persuasive text, and then deciding on how we shall be using this in our essay. Yes, I happened to be one of those students who never planned anything and preferred to jump straight into the introduction, hoping all my thoughts would fall into place along the way. Allow me to let you in on a little secret: that was a notoriously bad idea.

My essays always turned out as garbled, barely legible messes and I always managed to talk myself into circles. It is also crucial that you know what exactly should be going into the planning process. There are two main aspects of planning that you need to focus on for a Language Analysis essay: analysis and implementation. I know that might not make much sense right now, but allow me to explain:. This includes reading through your articles and picking out all the pieces that seem like persuasive techniques. This part is the lengthiest and it may take you some time to fully understand all of the article.

That is, deciding which arguments or language devices we will analyse in paragraph 1, paragraph 2 and so on. This part is largely up to you and the way in which you prefer to link various ideas. Below is an example of how you might choose to plan your introduction and body paragraph. It may seem a bit wordy, but this is the recommended thought process you should consider when mapping out your essay, as explained in the following sections of this blog post. With enough practice you may even be able to remember some of these elements in your head, rather than writing it out in detail during each SAC or exam it might be a little time consuming.

Note: Sentences in quotation marks '' represent where the information has been implemented in the actual introduction. Context : Detention of Asylum Seekers is currently a popular topic of discussion, 'issue regarding the treatment and management of asylum seekers'. Contention : Methods must be revaluated, 'better solution must be sought'. Audience : Regular readers, 'regular readers of the popular news publication site'. Purpose : Incite critical conversation, 'persuade readers to be similarly critical of the initiative'. Context: Detention of Asylum Seekers is currently a popular topic of discussion, 'issue regarding the treatment and management of asylum seekers'. Contention: Detention of Asylum Seekers is wrong, 'detention as a whole is inhumane'.

Audience: Those in favour of Asylum Seekers, 'supporters of his resource centre'. Purpose: Allow Asylum Seekers into the country, '[barring them from entering the country]…should be ceased immediately'. Example : 'harsh', 'brutal regime', 'needlessly cruel' to invoke discomfort. Example : Amnesty International, UN, etc. Example : Writes he 'cannot imagine the horrors', inviting readers to try too. Example : 'pain', 'suffering', 'deprivation of hope' to invoke sympathy. Example : Blames Australian Government for the 'suffering inflicted'. Having a top notch introduction not only sets the standard for the rest of your language analysis, but it gives you a chance to set yourself apart from the crowd. Thus, having a punchy introduction is bound to catch their attention.

In addition to having a solid beginning, there are a few other things you need to include in your intro, namely, CCTAP. Well, the nifty little acronym stands for C ontext, C ontention, T one, A udience and P urpose, which are the five key pieces of information you need to include about both of your articles within your introduction. In addition to all the various language devices we collected during planning, you will need to scan through the articles to find this information in order to give the reader of your essay the brief gist of your articles without ever having read them.

And now we reach the meat of your essay - the body paragraphs. A typical essay should have at least three of these, no less, although some people might feel the need to write four or five. While this may seem like a good idea to earn those extra marks, you should never feel pressured to do so if you already have three good paragraphs planned out. What your teachers and examiners are really looking for is a comprehensive understanding of the texts and the way in which you organise your ideas into paragraphs.

Now, onto writing the actual paragraphs. Some of these you may have already heard of before and you might even have a preference as to which one you will use. But regardless of what you choose, it is important that you add all the correct elements, as leaving any of them out may cost you vital marks. This step may involve analysing the image for what it is, or linking the imagery with an already existing argument within the article. Whatever you deduce it to mean, just make sure you slip it into one of the paragraphs in your essay.

Here is an example of an integrated paragraph learn more about integrated vs. And some might argue it is in fact the easiest, because now all you need to do is summarise all of those body paragraphs into a concise little one. Simple right? Under no circumstances should you be using your conclusion to add in any new information, so just make sure you give a brief description of your previous arguments and you should be good to go! And one more thing: never start your conclusions with 'In conclusion'.

Good luck with your own essays! Shakespeare uses the metaphor of theatre for fate. Since Shakespeare has so many plays chances are your text will be excluded. Othello follows the Moorish general Othello and his relationship with his wife, Desdemona. The antagonist Iago is jealous that Cassio was made Lieutenant instead of him, and seeks vengeance on Othello. Through careful manipulation of his Wife Emilia, Roderigo, Cassio, and Othello, Iago convinces Othello that Desdemona is unfaithful, sending him into an obsessive jealousy. Shakespeare was born in England in , in the middle of the Renaissance Period. This is why Shakespeare plots are famously reinterpretations of Ancient histories and Roman plays.

Changes in education resulted in the Elizabethan moral and social customs being questioned. This included the Divine Right of Kings, and notions of gender and identity. Religion is also significant in this period, and the Protestant Reformation is a subject often alluded to by Shakespeare. The context and intent of the author are important considerations when studying VCE English or Literature.

Any good copy of Shakespeare will have definitions of these words in the margin or opposite page. Comedy is tonally more light-hearted, and has an apparently happy-ending. Despite being made to entertain, they are rarely unsophisticated, and the genre may mask something more sinister. Tragedies cannot be defined by their tone, however. They are defined by a tragic hero, who has a fatal flaw or Hamartia that results in their downfall. Tragedies will usually end in the unnecessary loss of lives and an unhappy ending for all involved. An analysis considering the conventions of Tragedy--like hamartia and tragic heroes--is a great way to stand out when discussing Shakespeare, and so when interpreting a tragedy you should consider what about it is tragic.

Either of these options reveals Othello to be a tragedy, however they both say different things about the characters and plot. If Iago manipulates Othello, the tragedy is because a fundamental good person is corrupted. However if Othello was always mistrusting, the play becomes tragic as the audience must watch an unloving marriage slowly dissolve. Next, we have the two ways Shakespeare formats his dialogue. Students will often focus on what the characters say without considering how it is said. Knowing the difference between Verse and Prose and how they are used is an easy way to stand out in an essay. Verse is essentially poetry, where one line follows another. This is a line of poetry with 10 syllables where every second syllable is stressed.

This creates a kind of bounce or flow like a heartbeat. Pay attention to when it is not followed, or when characters are interrupted during the pentameter. When the pentameter is interrupted by another character, look at who is interrupting it. It is likely to reveal a power dynamic between the two characters. Alternatively, a character finishing the pentameter, literally finishing their sentence, could be a symbol of love or affection between them. Using linguistic devices like the iambic pentameter as evidence shows an understanding of the text beyond the words spoken. The alternative format is prose. Is the way we speak normally in conversation, or how a normal novel is written. In act 1 scene 3 of Othello, Iago speaks to Roderigo in prose and then transitions to verse once Roderigo leaves.

This is a theme that can lead to a long discussion and gives you the opportunity to express your own opinion. Are the characters acting with free-will, or is some other force impacting their fate? However, the inclusion of the witches in Macbeth subverts the tragic structure and implies Macbeth is being toyed with. The different uses of verse and prose are a good way to show when characters are genuine or performing for others.

In Othello, disorder could be represented by Iago, destabilising the lives of those around him through his use of rhetoric and manipulation. Order is then returned when Iago is revealed and Othello takes his life, recognising himself as tragically misused. Analysing the theme of order and disorder would support the interpretation that Othello is a good man controlled and abused by disorder and manipulation. So, hopefully this very brief introduction helps you get into Shakespeare! And remember that in order to read Shakespeare, one must first read Shakespeare. It may take several readings or viewings to grasp what is happening in the play, only after that can you start to analyse in the way I have today. Hey everyone! To find out more, you can check out the full details of the course here!

Whilst he is indeed known for his hair-curling thrillers, Rear Window is a slightly subtler film which focuses not on a murderer at large, but rather a crippled photographer who never even leaves his apartment. Our protagonist L. After breaking his leg after a racing accident, Jeff begins to spy on his neighbours, one of whom he suspects of having committed a murder.

Despite some initial misgivings, his insurance nurse Stella Thelma Ritter and lover Lisa Grace Kelly also come to share his suspicions and participate in his spying. Their contributions ultimately allow the mystery to be solved. On the other hand, Kelly portrays a character much like herself, a refined and elegant urbanite whose lifestyle inherently clashes with that of an action photographer. Before getting into the nitty-gritty of the film, it is crucial to understand a bit about its historical context. Released in the post-war period , the film is undoubtedly characterised by the interpersonal suspicion which defined the era. In particular, there was a real fear in America of Communist influences and Soviet espionage - so much so that a tribunal was established, supposedly to weed out Communists despite a general lack of evidence.

This practice of making accusations without such evidence is now known as the McCarthyism, named after the senator behind the tribunal. During this era, people really did fear one another, since the threat of Communism felt so widespread. At the same time, the s saw a boom in photojournalism as a legitimate profession. To some extent, this was fuelled by the heyday of Life magazine an American weekly, as well-known then as Time magazine is today. This explains the prevalence of cameras in his life, as well as his ability to emotionally distance himself from those whom he observes through the lens.

Another crucial historical element is the institution of marriage , and how important it was to people during the s. It was an aspiration which everyone was expected to have, and this is reflected statistically - only 9. People also tended to marry at a younger age, generally in their early 20s. Conversely, divorce was highly frowned upon, and once you were married, you would in general remain married for the rest of your life. In particular, divorced women suffered massive financial difficulties, since men, as breadwinners, held higher-paying jobs, and women were only employed in traditionally female roles e. Possibly the central tenet of the film is the big question of privacy.

The character of Doyle says almost these exact words:. So to speak. Evidently, this is a major moral dilemma. If you suspect that someone has committed murder, does this give you the right to disregard their privacy and surveil them in this way? In some ways, the audience is also positioned to reflect on this question, and in particular, reflect on the paranoia that characterised and defined the McCarthy era. Somewhat separate to these questions is the romance between Jeff and Lisa, since Hitchcock seems to keep the thriller storyline and the romance storyline separate for a large part of the film. Their contrasting lifestyles and world views present a major obstacle in the fulfilment of their romance, and the murder mystery both distracts and unites them.

The cinematographic techniques employed in Rear Window are important ways of shaping our understanding of the film, and Hitchcock uses a wide array of visual cues to communicate certain messages. Lighting is one such cue that he uses a lot - it is said that at certain points in filming, he had used every single light owned by the studio in which this film was shot. In this film, lighting is used to reveal things: when the lights are on in any given apartment, Jeff is able to peer inside and watch through the window almost resembling a little TV screen; Jeff is also able to channel surf through the various apartments - Hitchcock uses panning to show this. On the contrary, a lack of lighting is also used to hide things, and we see Thorwald utilise this at many stages in the film.

Jeff also takes advantage of this, as he often sits in a position where he is very close to being in the shadows himself; if he feels the need, he is able to retreat such that he is fully enshrouded. Low-key lighting in these scenes also contributes to an overall sense of drama and tension. Another handy visual cue is the cross-cut , which is an example of the Kuleshov effect. The Kuleshov effect is an editing technique whereby a sequence of two shots is used to convey information more effectively than just a single shot.

Specifically, the cross-cut shifts from a shot of a person to a second shot of something that this person is watching. That being said, one of the benefits of studying a film is that these symbols tend to be quite visual - you are able to see these recurring images and this may make them easier to spot. Because he has been rendered immobile by his leg, readers can infer from this symbol that he is also incapable of working or even leaving his apartment, let alone solving a murder mystery. The broken leg is in this sense a symbol of his powerlessness and the source of much of his discontent.

Another interpretation of the broken leg however, is that it represents his impotence which on one hand is synonymous for powerlessness or helplessness, but is on the other hand an allusion to his apparent inability to feel sexual desire. Being constantly distracted from Lisa by other goings-on in the courtyard definitely supports this theory. It is the main means through which he observes other people, and thus, it also symbolises his voyeuristic tendencies - just as his broken leg traps and inhibits him, his camera lens transports him out of his own apartment and allows him to project his own fears and insecurities into the apartments of his neighbours, watching them for entertainment, for visual pleasure.

In this latter sense, the camera lens can also be understood as a phallic symbol, an erection of sorts. Her initial wardrobe represents her elegance and refinery whilst also communicating a degree of incompatibility with Jeff. However, as she changes and compromises throughout the film, her wardrobe also becomes much more practical and much less ostentatious as the film wears on, until she is finally wearing a smart blouse, jeans and a pair of loafers. The change in her wardrobe reflects changes in her character as well. Finally, the wedding ring of Mrs Thorwald is hugely significant; wedding rings in general represent marriage and commitment, and are still very important symbols that people still wear today.

Now it's your turn to give these essay topics a go! In our ebook A Killer Text Guide: Rear Window , we've take 5 of these essay topics and show you our analysis, brainstorm and plan for each individual topic. These ABC components are:. While we should use film techniques as part of our evidence repertoire in each essay, this particular type of essay prompt literally begs for it. Contention: Through a diverse range of film techniques, Hitchcock instils fear and apprehension into the audience of Rear Window.

P1: The opening sequence of Rear Window employs various film techniques to immediately establish underlying tension in its setting. If you find this helpful, then you might want to check out our A Killer Text Guide: Rear Window ebook, which has all the information and resources you need to succeed in your exam, with detailed summaries and background information, as well as a detailed analysis of all five essay prompts! It can be difficult to understand what is expected of you, as this SAC definitely varies from your typical English essay!

Whilst your other English SACs may require you to write in a formal and sophisticated manner, the oral presentation SAC is the one shining exception! Many students fall into the trap of writing a frankly boring and uninspiring speech that does no justice to their academic ability. Here are some mistakes to watch out for:. Your school may or may not already give you a list of topics to choose from.

However, in the event that you must research your own topic, it is essential that you choose an issue relevant to your current audience. You must adopt a clear contention in your speech. Do not, for example, write a five-minute speech on why one sports team is better than the other, or why murder should be illegal. Choose an issue that you can take a passionate stance on and engage the audience with. Avoid a contention that is obvious and aim to actually persuade your class. This is one of the biggest mistakes students make when writing their oral presentation. I cannot stress this enough — your speech is not a formally written text response! You are presenting your stance on an issue, which means that you are allowed to be passionate and creative.

You can educate your audience on the facts without boring them to sleep. Samples 1 and 2 have the same information. Yet, Sample 2 engages with the audience in a much more effective manner. Try to avoid an overly formal tone and speak with passion and interest. Presenting in front of your class can be a very daunting experience. However, in order to distinguish yourself from your classmates, you must speak clearly and with confidence. Try to avoid making the following mistakes:. Think back to primary school. Remember when your teacher would read you a storybook, and they would put on voices to make the story more engaging and interesting?

The same sort of idea applies to your oral presentation. Simply reading a well-written speech will not get you marks. Rather, you should talk to your audience. Make eye contact, maintain good posture, and project your voice. Confidence is key! The oral presentation SAC is not an assessment that you can simply wing on the day. Oftentimes, poor scores stem from a lack of preparation which can be reflected in the way students present themselves — and stalling for time is a big giveaway.

This can be especially difficult if you are presenting the same topic as one of your peers. This is another big mistake students make when presenting. Now, imagine if every person who presented before you began their speech with:. It gets repetitive. You can distinguish yourself by beginning in a myriad of other ways. How to Write a Killer Oral Presentation outlines other ways to start your speech with examples! Your teacher will be able to tell if you choose a topic that you have no interest in, or if you are simply regurgitating information. Use this SAC to learn about an issue and take interest in your learning. Believe me, your grades will thank you for it. Whether you are allowed to present with visuals or not is up to your English teacher.

However, it is essential that you do not incorrectly use these visuals, as it can cost you marks.

Menelaus was enraged and he The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible his Internal Events In Hamlet Agamemnon to lead an expedition to retrieve The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible. My essays always turned The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible as garbled, barely legible messes and Women In Platos The Republic always managed to talk myself into circles. Lochnan, Katherine. Understanding the different The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible will help you move beyond a The Qualities Of John Proctor In The Crucible one-size-fits-all structure. For once in your life, do not be a pussy.

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